Radiometric dating notes

15-Jan-2015 02:31 by 6 Comments

Radiometric dating notes - Active wechat id horny

So, we start out with two isotopes of uranium that are unstable and radioactive.

The uranium-235 to lead-207 decay series is marked by a half-life of 704 million years.

With rubidium-strontium dating, we see that rubidium-87 decays into strontium-87 with a half-life of 50 billion years.

By anyone's standards, 50 billion years is a long time.

So, if you know the radioactive isotope found in a substance and the isotope's half-life, you can calculate the age of the substance. Well, a simple explanation is that it is the time required for a quantity to fall to half of its starting value.

So, you might say that the 'full-life' of a radioactive isotope ends when it has given off all of its radiation and reaches a point of being non-radioactive.

When the isotope is halfway to that point, it has reached its half-life.

There are different methods of radiometric dating that will vary due to the type of material that is being dated.The methods work because radioactive elements are unstable, and they are always trying to move to a more stable state. This process by which an unstable atomic nucleus loses energy by releasing radiation is called radioactive decay.The thing that makes this decay process so valuable for determining the age of an object is that each radioactive isotope decays at its own fixed rate, which is expressed in terms of its half-life.In fact, this form of dating has been used to date the age of rocks brought back to Earth from the moon.So, we see there are a number of different methods for dating rocks and other non-living things, but what if our sample is organic in nature?For example, how do we know that the Iceman, whose frozen body was chipped out of glacial ice in 1991, is 5,300 years old?